The long wait is finally over, but given that it looks like it’s going to be a Patriots blowout, I can’t say I’m thrilled.

Anyone else rooting for a scoreless tie that goes on for so long, they have to call the game? Or the power goes out in overtime? Because that would actually be kind of cool, in a masochistic way.

A dominating week for UCLA

February 3, 2008

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Thursday: UCLA 84, Arizona State 51

Saturday: UCLA 82, Arizona 60

Yep, it’s been a pretty dominating week for UCLA basketball. Saturday night, UCLA got out early against Arizona and stayed up by a wide margin the whole game. The Bruins were actually leading by as much as 31 at one point. Complete domination over a tournament-caliber team, and the whole country got to see it, as it was ESPN’s featured game.

This team looks like it’s ready for the Final Four already, two months ahead of schedule.

Your Pac-10 standings at the half-way point of the conference schedule:

8-1 UCLA (20-2)
7-2 Stanford (18-3)
5-4 Washington State (17-4)
5-4 Arizona (15-7)
5-4 USC (14-7)
4-5 Arizona State (14-7)
4-5 California (13-7)
4-5 Oregon (13-8)
3-6 Washington (12-10)
0-9 Oregon State (6-15)

Poor Oregon State.

57 days ’til Opening Day

February 3, 2008

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There are 57 days left until that best day of the year, MLB Opening Day.

57 is also the uniform number of Fransicso Rodriguez. Frankie emerged during the 2002 playoffs, where as a set-up man he got five wins and allowed only four runs in 18 2/3 innings (1.93 ERA) with a ridiculous 28 strikeouts.

What non-Angel fans may not have realized though, is Frankie pitched all of five games for the Angels in the regular season. 5 2/3 innings. That’s all.

It’s almost ludicrous know when you think about it. Because logically, it is. A guy who had pitched in five games in his career was being counted on to pitch the most important innings in franchise history. But Frankie looked so sensational, so dominant that any questioning whether he should be on the mound was quickly put to rest.

Of course, Frankie has been pretty dominant since then too, establishing himself as one of the best closers in the major leagues. And he’s only 26 — hopefully, he has a long career ahead of him.

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